Welcome

Dennis Jones is a Jamaican-born international economist, who has lived most of the time in the UK and USA, and latterly in Guinea, west Africa. He moved back to the Caribbean in 2007. This blog contains his observations on life on this small eastern Caribbean island, as well as views on life and issues on a broader landscape, especially the Caribbean and Africa.

*NEW!!! LISTEN TO BLOG POSTS FEATURE ADDED!!!*

*PLEASE READ COMMENTS POLICY--NO ANONYMOUS COMMENTS, PLEASE*

*REFERENCES TO NEWSPAPER OR MEDIA REPORTS ARE USUALLY FOLLOWED BY LINKS TO ACTUAL REPORTS*

*IMAGES MAY BE ENLARGED BY CLICKING ON THEM*

*SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG BY E-MAIL (SEE BOX IN SIDE BAR)*


______________________________________

**You may contact me by e-mail at livinginbarbados[at]gmail[dot]com**

Monday, August 31, 2009

There's A Riot Going On? Not A Hope In Hell That Carnival Wont Be Fun

For a Caribbean exile there are fewer happier places to be than in London for the August Bank Holiday--today. Kno' wha' I mean? It has to be lived to be understood. If you lived through it over several decades, you will understand it better. If you remember how important Notting Hill is to people from the Caribbean who live in England you will understand it better still. From scene of racist violence, with 'Teddy Boys' attacking them, to place of fun and jollity and harmony? Yes. Notting Hill has done that. Innit.

It's a long time since I lived in London, and longer still since I did the Carnival. I have never been to Carnival in the Caribbean. But to hear all of the region's musical sounds and see so much of its regional colour, and to smell and taste so much of its regional cooking, being in Notting Hill is like a Carnival island hop. Cor blimey!

I'm not going to repeat a history of living in London. But, it's really nice to get to go back and feel the place very now and again. I know a lot of the country from visiting and having friends from most parts. I love the regional differences that you can sample all the time, in things like beer and cheeses. Wickid or wot?

I hope that Notting Hill's significance is not lost on most people. I would love to take my youngest child there soon so that she can sample the flair of the Carnival and for me to be able to pass on a bit of history to her.It's important. If not, then her sister, who was born in London, will have to do it; I've passed on to her some of the history already. They need to remember that it was really from a struggle that something truly wonderful grew: riots and deaths; violent clashes with the police; respect and involvement from the English community; respect and involvement from foreigners in England and outside; respect for oneself from the Caribbean community. All of that is on the streets of Notting Hill...and more. Aint no joke.

2 comments:

clayton said...

P. Clayton Huggins Interesting. Two recommendations: Trinidad Carnival; because it's the template for all the different carnivals held in other W.I. islands and the West indian communities overseas. Also Caribana. The largest such Carnival by W. Indians outside of the W. I. Troupe leaders from Trinidad regularly make the treck to Toronto, including Peter Minshall, Google him...I actually saw his "washer woman" in the early 80's and was stunned by the whole spectacle.

These are traditions worth passing on to the next generation.

Rose Jackman said...

Great sentiments:The spirit of carnival is most captivating, it gets hold of the individual and causes free expression and it is for the Trinidadian a wonderful means of creativity expression of color and friendship. Let us keep Carnival clean and way to be united.