Welcome

Dennis Jones is a Jamaican-born international economist, who has lived most of the time in the UK and USA, and latterly in Guinea, west Africa. He moved back to the Caribbean in 2007. This blog contains his observations on life on this small eastern Caribbean island, as well as views on life and issues on a broader landscape, especially the Caribbean and Africa.

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Saturday, April 04, 2009

Wants A Pun? It's Time For Word Play.

I love puns. I probably see them too often, if such a thing is possible. Take a simple parting yesterday. My tennis partner was rushing home so that he and his wife could walk on the sand by the sea. "Go ahead. See you week after next," I said. His reply of "I'm glad you understand that I must satisfy the beach," made me blurt out with laughter. He looked on perplexed.

I enjoyed the latest Saturday's Child column, by Tony Deyal in the Nation (see article), which was about puns. One of the better ones was when he was talking to a friend attending an environmental conference, and the friend said: "Sounds like you're having a hail of a good time. However, remember that hail hath no fury like a woman stoned. All hail. Tony." His friend was raining supreme.

I sometimes think that people take themselves too seriously and certainly see too rarely the humour in what they say. Last week, at the market, we had almost a good half hour that was based on puns, double entendre and other word play. Two friends were telling us about their night together at dance class; one friend's wife was listening intently. What we got was "We spent the night in each other's arms, with our bodies close and our legs often tangled. It was so tiring and sweaty." Needing elaboration, we heard from the lady. "He never took his hands off me." Asked how they stayed the course during the night, they gladly told us "We were not going to let the other couple lick us. They would have to be satisfied with the bottom place this time." We laughed ourselves silly.

Every time I see a picture of Barbados' police commissioner, Darwin Dottin, I cannot help quipping to myself "Are Dottin's eyes really crossed, or is it just his tease."

If you really need a laugh you can check the 'A pun a day' website. Today's was a well-worn one: “I once worked at a factory that made boat paddles. The starting pay was ten dollars an oar.”

Some of the Barbadian politicians are good for a laugh when you repeat their errant mutterings. But, they also offer play time with their names. Former PM, Owen Arthur, and the current leader of the Opposition, Mia Amor Mottley, each lend themselves to good word play. "Me, a mere motley collection of Bajan parts ...", "Owing half a [term of your choice]..." With the House of Assembly having a cast including Blackett, Best, Lowe, Marshall, Paul, Payne, Toppin, and Todd, there's plenty for the witty to play with.

I am not going back to the US presidential election campaign, and we had a good time with Gov. Palin, who is now paling back in the cold of Alaska after truly paling in comparison to Sen. Obama.

So, now I have another outlet if I get frustrated with how events are turning out. I wont just play dumb and gripe.

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