Welcome

Dennis Jones is a Jamaican-born international economist, who has lived most of the time in the UK and USA, and latterly in Guinea, west Africa. He moved back to the Caribbean in 2007. This blog contains his observations on life on this small eastern Caribbean island, as well as views on life and issues on a broader landscape, especially the Caribbean and Africa.

*NEW!!! LISTEN TO BLOG POSTS FEATURE ADDED!!!*

*PLEASE READ COMMENTS POLICY--NO ANONYMOUS COMMENTS, PLEASE*

*REFERENCES TO NEWSPAPER OR MEDIA REPORTS ARE USUALLY FOLLOWED BY LINKS TO ACTUAL REPORTS*

*IMAGES MAY BE ENLARGED BY CLICKING ON THEM*

*SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG BY E-MAIL (SEE BOX IN SIDE BAR)*


______________________________________

**You may contact me by e-mail at livinginbarbados[at]gmail[dot]com**

Sunday, July 20, 2008

Views of The Bahamas

Bahamian souse is not anything like its Bajan cousin, except that it is often eaten on a Saturday. First, the Bahamian version is a dish served hot, not cold. Second, it does not use pork, but usually uses chicken (drummies and wings), and/or sheep's tongue. Third, it is cooked with potatoes, peppercorns, celery and onions; it has no breadfruit or sweet pototo. Finally, you eat it with "Johnny cake"--not the Jamaican dumpling variety, but a sweetish bread (cooked in a flat pan like cornbread)--which Bahamians lather with butter. You add pepper mixed with lemon juice and fresh pepper to suit your mouth's fire resistance. Real men eat souse with cold beer.

Lake Cunningham is one of Nassau's prime locations by which to have a home; it's located on the western end of New Providence. It's lovely to see during the day, and is surrounded by woodland; a great place to see birdlife. I have never seen its water level low, even after long period. I don't know which of the many ways of formation created this lake (but see some options in the link).

Poincianas (or "pomseeanna" as Nassovians call them; or Flamboyant, as they are called in Barbados, using the French term) adorn Nassau at this time of year, when the flowers are brought out by the increase in heat. The tree, which is a native of Madagascar, presumably found its way to the Caribbean through the exploits of one of our sets of colonial rulers. Here they line many streets, and are found in many large yards. The trees are also seen in many cities world wide, where they make wonderful avenues. Guinea's capital, Conakry, has a set which were not well maintained, but when in bloom could make that city look much less grimy and unloved than usual.

2 comments:

titilayo said...

The idea of eating sheep's tongue made me shudder, even though I used to eat and enjoy pig trotters in souse on a regular basis. The notion of warm souse is also tying up my head a little bit. The johnnycakes (like Bajan bakes?) lathered with butter, though, those sound like my kinda thing.

True Bahamian said...

Eh- I is a full fledged Bahamian- and you got this article on point. Like titilayo- I am amazed at how yall eat the souse. To my understanding- you guys eat it cold? "If it aint pipin' hot- it aint gettin eat"- my Grammy used to say. The only thing that we eat cold is conch salad in the Bahamas...lol